That spring my wife covered the walls of our living room in newsprint.

By Sadia Quraeshi Shepard
Essays    Reportage    Marginalia    Interviews    Poetry    Fiction    Videos    Everything   
Fiction

That spring my wife covered the walls of our living room in newsprint.

Essays

Creativity, as it turns out, is especially hard when your brain is in survival mode.

Essays

You spoke through the impossible and you teach us once more how a story, through a faithful, stubborn kind of continuation, can be like a collective strength.

Fiction

He collected the past in amber, often describing war memorials as beautiful. He called himself a gardener.

Fiction

Five American Fables

Fiction

“Big rain, isn’t it?”

Fiction

The hagwon director was the most successful woman we knew at the time… Her short hair was perfectly coiffed, her full lips painted red like a Western woman’s.

Fiction

Can you say Mommy’s name, sweetie? Can you do that for Mommy?

Fiction

“The very moment I thought I was lost / My dungeon shook and the chains fell off.”

Fiction

The slippers allowed her the pleasure of spatial recognition, an opportunity to go back in time and become the person cared for, rather than the one perpetually burdened with the responsibility of caring.

Fiction

She should moisturize more often, drink at least three liters of hot water with lemon each day, and wear silicon sheet masks to bed to hide the stigmata of a woman who was everything.

Fiction

And though I knew it was someone’s son, I unburied the rooster in the dark and kick-started a fire and roasted it on a spit, my fingers lamping with grease.

Fiction

The sunflowers fall, right along with their mason jar, in the middle of the night. Their heads too gloriously full of early July. How they seem to know everything, except the virus.

Fiction

“The girl didn’t want a new life; she wanted her old comfortable life, though it was as worn out as her pajamas.”

Fiction

“What’s the most serious problem? Home lor! Drugs lor! Everyday besides sleeping and playing games you do what? Yes, kill people lor! So the government commercialized the plan lor, scientists spent ten years to research how to store up sleep, so these Juveniles can be useful lor.”

Fiction

You couldn’t claim that you were lost. The footsteps of your comrades dragged you sharply back into the present, no wavering possible.

Fiction

“The ecology and economy of the region is under threat. This Transpacific Literary Project folio, Monsoon Notebook is for these essential, vanishing, and unruly waters.”

Essays

A headline buried deep inside the paper catches my eye. “They’re extending AFSPA for another six months in Assam,” I announce. She nods, and continues to massage the green beans in her bowl.

Fiction

땀과 핏물과 진물이 뒤섞여 끈적한 그의 맨발이 젖어 번들거린다. || His bare feet, sticky with a mix of sweat and blood and ooze, glisten.

Fiction

20 Thai Baht = 33 Philippine Pesos = 44 Indian Rupees = x bolt of fabric = y square vuông of rice = 15,000 Vietnamese đồng = 2,600 Cambodian Riel = 2.6 Malaysian Ringgit = 9,100 Indonesian Rupiah = unquantifiable sweat

Fiction

That spring my wife covered the walls of our living room in newsprint.

Fiction

She should moisturize more often, drink at least three liters of hot water with lemon each day, and wear silicon sheet masks to bed to hide the stigmata of a woman who was everything.

Essays

Creativity, as it turns out, is especially hard when your brain is in survival mode.

Fiction

And though I knew it was someone’s son, I unburied the rooster in the dark and kick-started a fire and roasted it on a spit, my fingers lamping with grease.

Essays

You spoke through the impossible and you teach us once more how a story, through a faithful, stubborn kind of continuation, can be like a collective strength.

Fiction

The sunflowers fall, right along with their mason jar, in the middle of the night. Their heads too gloriously full of early July. How they seem to know everything, except the virus.

Fiction

He collected the past in amber, often describing war memorials as beautiful. He called himself a gardener.

Fiction

“The girl didn’t want a new life; she wanted her old comfortable life, though it was as worn out as her pajamas.”

Fiction

Five American Fables

Fiction

“What’s the most serious problem? Home lor! Drugs lor! Everyday besides sleeping and playing games you do what? Yes, kill people lor! So the government commercialized the plan lor, scientists spent ten years to research how to store up sleep, so these Juveniles can be useful lor.”

Fiction

“Big rain, isn’t it?”

Fiction

You couldn’t claim that you were lost. The footsteps of your comrades dragged you sharply back into the present, no wavering possible.

Fiction

The hagwon director was the most successful woman we knew at the time… Her short hair was perfectly coiffed, her full lips painted red like a Western woman’s.

Fiction

“The ecology and economy of the region is under threat. This Transpacific Literary Project folio, Monsoon Notebook is for these essential, vanishing, and unruly waters.”

Fiction

Can you say Mommy’s name, sweetie? Can you do that for Mommy?

Essays

A headline buried deep inside the paper catches my eye. “They’re extending AFSPA for another six months in Assam,” I announce. She nods, and continues to massage the green beans in her bowl.

Fiction

“The very moment I thought I was lost / My dungeon shook and the chains fell off.”

Fiction

땀과 핏물과 진물이 뒤섞여 끈적한 그의 맨발이 젖어 번들거린다. || His bare feet, sticky with a mix of sweat and blood and ooze, glisten.

Fiction

The slippers allowed her the pleasure of spatial recognition, an opportunity to go back in time and become the person cared for, rather than the one perpetually burdened with the responsibility of caring.

Fiction

20 Thai Baht = 33 Philippine Pesos = 44 Indian Rupees = x bolt of fabric = y square vuông of rice = 15,000 Vietnamese đồng = 2,600 Cambodian Riel = 2.6 Malaysian Ringgit = 9,100 Indonesian Rupiah = unquantifiable sweat